Walking Here and There

So…about five months ago my car got hit and stopped being road worthy. Honestly, it was sort of a relief once the immediate crisis of the scenario settled in my mind. Although that car hauled me around for five years it was a lemon from the time of purchase. Often, it’s mechanical oddities stressed me out, and although I wanted to be all mindful and let it go, this question of whether or not I would actually get to where I was going always rested in my mind. Probably the best thing about the car was that I developed quite a Japa yoga practice chanting Om, Sohum and the Ganesh mantra while driving around and wondering if it would make it. So, rather joyfully, I sold it for parts and pocketed the money I received for damages.

At first, I went to the bank and started the uncomfortable process of financing and that entire intrusive dance. After the dismal investigation of exaggerated car costs and interest laden payments, I had second thoughts about the whole structure of our society and the cost of cars. I am not an eco-warrior and not trying to make a statement but after a rather heated conversation with a bank official and shady vibes from more than one car salesman I decided to put one foot in front of the other and begin walking since I am lucky enough to live only twenty five minutes from work by foot.

Now, remember, I live in Alaska and this all happened in October. Winter and cold were approaching but I was determined to make a change. I purchased a warm slick jacket then made sure I had toasty gloves and hat. Smart Wool socks and beat up Extra Toughs came next. I was ready. Yes, I walked through snow and cold then into the bursting spring of Alaska. Most of all, I started to use my legs, felt connected to my body on a deeper level and saw the world around me again with fresh eyes.

When one walks, a whole vision opens up! One starts to see. Of course, we always see, but do we see? The obvious images of the same old landscape that I saw everyday now began to take on a character and a depth. The nuances of sky at different times of day initiated awakening before me, the shifts in air and the subtleties of the atmospheric moisture made sense to my body. I started to see the beauty again of Anchorage, Alaska even in the midst of grimy streets, wandering street people and dirty snow. The never ending whirl of light and darkness in this frontier landscape became real again for me as I watched the sunshine diminish in winter then return again behind the mountains as spring came back.

Then, there were the people of the street. The wandering folk of Anchorage who one sees on corners or at cross walks making their way through the elements. Sometimes drunk , sometimes moody, sometimes just getting by but always friendly, there is a certain communal aspect that they share and I get to be part of it as one of the walkers. We greet each other, sometimes just a nod or at times a random conversation about weather while waiting for a red light so we can cross some raging road.

Walking clears the mind and focuses one on the here and now. I believe this completely and this experience has furthered my conviction on this point. I think I will continue to walk and keep this connection to myself and the greater world.

Take sometime and just walk here and there. Find a way to let your feet carry you and enjoy the journey.

Om Shanti…

 

 

 

David is a vinyasa style yoga teacher and lead indoor cycling instructor at Anchorage Yoga and Cycle way in up in Alaska, the land of ice and sun. He loves to find the connection of yoga to everyday life. Check out a one if his classes.

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