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Our Thirst for Experiential Travel

The very essence of travel has always been about seeking unique and memorable experiences. However, in recent years, we have become ever so dissatisfied with the same old well-trodden tourist trails. More than ever before, we are actively seeking to expand our horizons and dive deeper beyond the worn pages of a guidebook. We have developed a near-insatiable thirst to wander unique pathways and to connect with local cultures and real people. Rather than merely sightseeing or ticking off popular bucket-list itineraries, our travel plans are made with the desire to authentically immerse ourselves within a destination.

It is no surprise that experiential travel is the most significant, systemic trend in worldwide tourism today. The term ‘experiential travel’ typically refers to the idea of having a more immersive, local, authentic and/or active travel experience. While travel is inherently experiential by definition, how we travel and what we want from our bursts of nomadic living has seen a dramatic shift over the last decade.  

For many of us, experiences now far outweigh material possessions, and alongside this thirst for seeing the world is a global demand for travel that resonates on a deeper emotional level, more than a mere physical level. More than mere consumers, we seek to navigate our own journey and emerge at the other end transformed in a significant and memorable way.

This exciting shift is driving the travel industry to become more adventurous, more personalized, and more attuned to what makes each destination unique as they strive to convey a meaningful experience to travellers in a short period of time.  

The notion of the pre-packaged travel brochure has long seen its heyday. The hunt is now on for an experience that is unique, enriching and as far from the beaten path as possible. The one-size-fits-all package is now no longer appealing or relevant to the modern savvy consumer. Rather than sit by a pool with cocktail in hand, we want to have life-fulfilling journeys that closely align with our own personal values. Where travellers once talked about what they saw or did on a vacation, we now focus more intently on whom we met on the road and how a journey offered us a new worldview from which to ponder our own life and existence.

Earlier this year, Airbnb launched ‘experiences’ which are offered alongside the overwhelming amount of popular holiday rentals. This addition to the platform allows you to not only select your vacation property from any far-flung destination around the world, but to also choose from a diverse range of activities in that region, all offered by the local community. These can range from making crepes in Paris, to a graffiti tour of Barcelona, to a fabric workshop in Mexico, to a DIY tattoo session in Shanghai, to photography cycling tours through Prague and anything and everything in between.

Holiday companies around the world are following suit, expanding their offerings to meet this new demand. Travellers can try chocolate making in St. Lucia, sunrise yoga on a sandbank in the Maldives and street food safaris in Vietnam. Across the board, companies are creating fresh appeal for modern travellers by opening up opportunities where they can connect with local people. Whereas traditionally hotels have always devised ways to tempt their guests to stay within the hotel grounds to maximize revenue, the boom in experiential travel has encouraged hotels to act more like community portals, introducing guests to popular local experiences outside the realm of the hotel boundaries.

The Millennial demographic, perhaps more than any other, are driven by exotic locales and hands-on, adventure activities that push their boundaries and offer both transformational and also ‘insta-worthy’ moments. While there is a great deal of focus on Millennial travel trends, older generations are also driving significant demand for more experiential and adventurous travel options. The modern traveller, regardless of age, wants to forge deeper connections to the people, traditions and customs of the places they are visiting, adding a more meaningful and memorable component to their vacation. Travel companies are witnessing rising trends for new and more remote destinations within Asia, South America and Africa. This older generation of travellers are also inspired by personal interests; it’s not about seeing the Leaning Tower of Pisa or the Colosseum, it’s about learning how to make homemade tiramisu or stomping grapes during harvest season.

In the luxury segment, travel has become more focused on total curation and customization. Guests are encouraged to craft their own itineraries and high-end hotels and luxury travel companies are letting go of strict timetables and pre-determined plans to allow travellers to set their own agendas. If money is no issue, savvy travellers can create the most exclusive journey tailored to their wildest dreams; from Porsche ice-rally driving in Sweden, to luxury sea-kayaking trips around Indonesia in search of legendary komodo dragons, or a designer glamping safari tour along the Congo River from Kisangani to Kinshasa. Wealthy vacationers have often been the pioneers of adventurous travel into emerging destinations, proving again that adventure and experiential travel is not only for hearty youth, willing to risk life and limb for heart-stopping thrills.

The concept of experiential travel has also dramatically reshaped the wellness industry. The days of massage and wheatgrass shots have been surpassed by life-changing wellness journeys, meticulously crafted and seamlessly executed. Health and yoga retreats have dramatically multiplied in recent years as the demand for combining an exotic vacation with a healthy holiday has skyrocketed. At the click of a button we can browse a plethora of five star Ayurvedic resorts in India, exotic health spas in Thailand, guided luxury treks through Nepal or yoga sailing expeditions through the Greek islands. Popular health resort Six Senses, has recently introduced new multi-lodge wellness circuits that offers roaming wellness journeys that are set to redefine the wellness travel experience like never before.

So, what’s driving this new era of experiential travel? Chances are you have already guessed correctly. The dramatic interest in experiential travel can be primarily accredited to the predominance of social media in our modern lives. More than ever before, we are connected. We are acutely aware of what is going on around the world, we communicate daily with people in various time zones, we are bombarded with tens of thousands of images every single day; our horizons have dramatically expanded, primarily through the screens we are attached to and subjected to 24/7.

The frenetic nature of modern society induces a sense of urgency and desire. The rise of FOMO – the popular acronym for ‘fear of missing out’ – has driven us to want more, need more, and experience more, now. Driven and steered by social media, we are constantly searching for inspiration, gratification and happiness in unique ways. With our horizons broadened, experiential travel has stepped in, luring us to faraway lands. We are not only influenced by the happy travel snap shots offered by close friends and family. We are powerfully swayed and coerced through our infatuation with social media celebrities. Images of distant lands, people and cultures infiltrate our news feeds and inadvertently, our minds. Cliché vacations to Bali or Mexico no longer hold our interest when we are presented with glamping tents in Morocco, underwater hotels in the Maldives, clifftop cabins in Patagonia or luxury treehouses in the desert plains of Kenya. Digital nomads, millennials, Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers alike are all dialed into these latest travel trends which inspire cultural immersion far beyond the traditional UNESCO World Heritage Site lines.

When presented with these incredible global image hooks we have the means to search, click and book in moments. Platforms such as Bookings.com, Tripadvisor, Airbnb, and Sky Scanner have taken the power out of the travel agents hands, and delivered it directly to us, the consumer. But even as we roam further off the grid, we still want to stay connected. We want to update our status through our real-time experiences. With live Instagram stories, location pins, shared hashtags, and ‘checking in’ on Facebook, social media has become our publicly accessible travel diary and is an integral part of the modern travel experience.

The influence of experiential travel has also come to infiltrate our regular daily lives. No longer are we content with grabbing a coffee from Starbucks; we want to visit our local roaster, perch on handmade crate furniture and know which village the organic coffee beans have been ethically sourced from. No longer do we enjoy a glass of wine at home with our girlfriends; we want to visit the winery, do a tasting course, pick the grapes and understand the fermentation process. No longer do we eat out at the restaurant down the road; we take a Sunday drive to a free range farm where we pick our own greens from the garden, smell the bread baking and watch the chooks peck seed meters from our communal table. As we become tourists in our own cities, there are limitless ways to engage in experiential travel, whether it’s for a month, a week, a weekend or an hour.

If this trend is anything, it is optimistic. It proves that as a society, we want to connect, explore and broaden our knowledge and understanding of ourselves and one another. It proves that we want to push our boundaries and that we want more than the 9-5 with the annual family camping trip. It proves that we are drawn towards new horizons and that we are inherently programed to transform. It proves we want to be more than mere consumers on a predetermined path and we want to create our own journeys that we can filter and hashtag accordingly. It proves that we want more than mere stamps in our passport. It proves that we want to look back on our life, and be deeply moved by the people, places and journeys that we experienced.

 

 

Kelly Alexander is a passionate yoga teacher, plant-based chef and writer who has traveled and worked extensively across the world in health resorts, detox centers, raw food restaurants and wellness retreats. Kelly completed her 200hr yoga teacher training in Byron Bay, Australia in 2008 with Rachel Zinnman. She has a Raw Chef certification, is a qualified Holistic Health Coach, a published author and has a degree in Media & Creative Writing. A nomadic traveler and lover of nature, you are most likely to find Kelly upside down on her yoga mat, chasing a sunrise, or wandering through a local farmers market on the hunt for new culinary inspiration.

www.raw-by-nature.com

IG:  @_rawbynature_

 

Join the Yoga Trade family April 9-14, 2019 in Costa Rica for an immersive travel experience!!!

DEEP ECOLOGY of WELLNESS: Weaving the love of yoga and travel with regenerative lifestyle design.

https://yogatrade.com/deep-ecology-of-wellness-2019/

 

Yoga As a Mobile Career

Yoga teaches us about unity; not only of ourselves, but also of humankind. It teaches us to let go of attachments and appreciate impermanence. So does travel. My career in yoga has already taken me across North and Central America. Yoga can be a mobile career, and it’s one that has allowed me to move around, follow my own path and not have to be limited by staying in one place. What’s interesting is that the experiences I’ve gained keep bringing back the same lessons I go to the mat for.

Have you lived a nomadic lifestyle as a yoga teacher? Do you aspire to? Here I’ll share how yoga can help you connect with international communities and find new and exciting work opportunities.

When considering yoga as a mobile career, it’s important to note that some places will have more opportunities than others. When you visit a new area, it is beneficial to connect with the local community as they often have existing yoga teaching opportunities. Common places to find short-term yoga teaching opportunities include hostels and tourist destinations that have a “high season.” Meeting people who are vacationing and simply introducing your services can connect you to interested students. However, one of the easiest ways to connect with local communities before you even arrive is through social media, which brings us to the next tool that can help you grow a nomadic yoga business.

Online Presence

Traveling yoga teachers benefit from having a business card that clearly states their website, email and social media accounts. These tools become like a mobile yoga center, a place that students can be present, follow their teacher’s journey, and leave comments and reviews. These tools are helpful to showcase experience and professionalism for traveling teachers.

Teachers hoping to teach in any given location can use social media as an efficient way to advertise. On a recent trip to Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, I turned my one-week trip into a working vacation by simply connecting with the local community’s social media page. I taught classes at a hostel and a yoga center and advertised on the community’s social media page. Advertising this way has also been a successful practice for me when living in various communities in Mexico.

Online yoga work is another increasingly popular opportunity that is becoming more easily accessible to yoga teachers who have an existing online presence. Blog writing, live-streaming yoga classes, and pre-recorded videos all allow teachers to work from anywhere that has a reliable internet connection.

International Trainings and Trade Opportunities

Participating in international trainings and using online resources (like Yoga Trade!) allows teachers to connect to yoga communities all over the world. We never know who we are going to meet or where in the world relationships can take us. In my own experience, completing a yoga teacher training in Mexico led me to teach yoga throughout Mexico and to connect with yoga teachers living all over the world.

Work trade opportunities often open doors to many international opportunities to teach yoga online and in countries throughout the world. The positions can range from a few weeks to permanent teaching positions, many in beautiful tropical locations. Learning another language is also incredibly helpful, but it is common to find English yoga classes in many destinations. Getting out there and getting connected will often open many more doors, allowing you to continue your travels.

What kind of lifestyle are you seeking?

Yoga as a mobile career can look different for everyone depending on preferences and mobility. Some people may love to take a year to travel, live and work in as many places as possible, accepting several short-term teaching opportunities along the way. Others may prefer to live a mobile lifestyle that is ongoing and slower paced. They may choose to stay in places longer, spending time building local connections and a client base, or accepting longer-term trade opportunities. Some people have a yoga career in their home city, but would love to have regular opportunities to leave their routine for travel, growth and learning.

Yoga teaches us about community and connections. It’s a beautiful lesson that many nomadic yogis are able to connect to on a deeper level. The opportunities are out there! You just have to be open to them.

 

Molly Rae is a Sivananda is a writer at Yogapedia.com. She is a yoga teacher, mental health professional, blogger, musician and nomad. 

IG: yogapedia_com

Sustainable Yoga Travel – It’s Our Responsibility

“Surfing Macroeconomic Theory: Waves attract surfers. Surfing attracts energy. Energy attracts people. People attract capital. Investment attracts development. And so it goes. A quick survey from outer space would likely show an inordinate number of major coastal cities expanding outwards in concentric waves from a quality surf break.” — Steve Barilotti, Author

While yoga and surf travel have become leading niche markets in the global tourism industry, rarely do we stop to ponder the impact our destination lifestyles have on the coastal communities and natural environments where we travel to indulge our soulful meanderings.

Have you ever noticed that many of your favorite international yoga epicenters are also world-class surf spots? And similarly, do you find it strange – or even admittedly comforting – that many of these places, as they grow and develop to cater to surf and yoga tourists, end up looking and feeling the same in terms of accommodations, food and available amenities? Interestingly, yoga tourism tends to follow in the wake of surf tourism, after the initial exploratory phase when infrastructure and amenities begin to take root and surf destinations turn into towns built around surf and yoga experiences for tourists. After all, both surfers and yogis are often chasing the same sort of environment for a pristine nature immersion away from the crowds. In that search, however, we end up contributing to the complete transformation of both cultural and natural landscapes in the places we love to travel for surf and yoga.

As a sustainable tourism consultant, I’ve written extensively on the detrimental impacts of surfing tourism on coastal communities around the world, calling for locally defined standards for sustainable tourism and alternatives to development in surfing destinations. Now that yoga travel has become an international phenomenon to be reckoned with, it’s time we also interrogate the foundations of our travel-to-practice-and-teach-yoga lifestyle while exploring the potential for greater sustainability in the ways we approach our next yoga travel adventure.

First and foremost, let’s be realistic and not sugar-coat the environmental damage associated with the jet-set travel lifestyle common to many of us living a semi-nomadic yoga life. Fossil fuels and carbon emissions are the leading cause of climate change, and every time we hop on a long-distance flight to live our dreams in yoga paradise, we are contributing to the irreversible destruction of the planet. In addition, most of us are guilty of consuming more single-use plastics while traveling than when we’re at home. And, we’re less likely to prioritize sustainable producers if it means forfeiting convenience while we travel. Often, the result is a net increase in unsustainable consumption habits when travelling versus staying at home. While we practice mindfulness on the yoga mat, it’s also our responsibility to be mindful of our consumption habits when traveling, taking care to support Earth-minded service-providers and producers wherever humanly possible. Just because you’re not at home doesn’t mean you should let your sustainability priorities slide by the way-side.

Next, it’s important to be aware of how we carry our modern lifestyles and cultural attributes with us in the places we travel to practice and teach yoga, with powerful (and not always positive) effects on local people and the natural environment. Among the challenges that local communities face as more and more visitors flood to previously isolated locations are: loss of culture as locals seek to emulate the modern lifestyle and attain tourism-centered livelihoods, social inequality and marginalization resulting from upward pressure on prices forcing locals out of tourist zones, and rampant development responding to heightened tourist demand with little concern for nature. While we fulfill our yoga travel dreams, it’s important to be honest with ourselves in recognizing the impact we have on local places and people, no matter how positive our spiritual intentions may be.

Yes, surf and yoga tourism can help create jobs for local people and potentially contribute to deeper spiritual awareness as locals begin learning to surf and practicing yoga themselves. However, it’s most frequently the case that the majority of businesses in surf and yoga destinations are owned by foreigners and not by locals, which contributes to deep social inequalities and further marginalization of local people as the town grows and develops around tourism. This is why seeking out locally owned businesses and service providers is a vital first step in bringing greater sustainability to the way we travel – in yoga destinations and beyond.

What can we do?

There are a few ways to lessen your footprint while travelling, all of which relate to adopting an attitude geared toward minimizing excess consumption and respecting local ways of life and livelihood. This means prioritizing locally owned businesses and behaving as if you are a guest in someone else’s home wherever you go. Do your homework when booking accommodations and tours, as well as in choosing places to eat and shop, supporting locals as a means to improve their economic wellbeing and ensure that more money stays within the town’s economy. Eat local as much as possible, avoiding the imported goods you are familiar with at home. After all, there’s a reason you’ve left your comfort zone, and eating local is one of the easiest ways to contribute to greater sustainability while you travel.

Learn the local cultural standards and attune your actions accordingly, taking care to stay respectful in honoring cultural differences. Take an interest in the culture so local residents can feel that their way of life is beautiful and intrinsically valuable, not somehow backwards or less than in the ways it differs from the dominant modern lifestyle. This will also contribute to a more authentic travel experience if locals see that tourists are taking a real interest in their culture and not just looking for the same creature comforts curated to mimic modern amenities and help tourists feel at home.

And finally, hold your foreign service providers and fellow travelers accountable to sustainable practices, including waste water treatment, solid waste management, minimizing consumption and avoiding the use of single-use plastics. If you see foreign business owners cutting corners on essential sustainability practices and harming the natural environment in the process, say something. As a guest, you have an important role to play in helping hold business owners accountable to the environment, especially in places where regulation is lax, non-existent or unenforced.

Similarly, bring your own containers for to-go orders at restaurants, and ask the juice bar to fill up your water bottle instead of using a disposable plastic cup. Most importantly, avoid the temptation to lecture locals about sustainability – they are not to blame for the piles of trash left by visiting tourists. Instead, lead by example and encourage your travelling yogi comrades to do their part in leaving as little trace as possible in the places we love to practice and teach around the world.

When it comes to sustainable yoga travel, we are the change we have been waiting for.

 

 

Tara Ruttenberg is a writer, surfer, yogini and sustainability consultant in Santa Teresa, Costa Rica. Tara created Tarantula Surf (www.tarantulasurf.com / @tarantulasurf) as a space for authentic story sharing and engaging with new living paradigms.

How Yoga Travel Humbles The Control Freak

By the grace of the universe I found yoga at fourteen years old, and since then I have held on to it for dear life to remind myself to loosen my grip a little bit, to breathe, to recognize that I am being held, to trust in the beat of my own heart, to trust in the beat of, well, everything.

We won’t dive too deeply into where these control patterns stem from (some Buddhists such as Pema Chodron believe it all comes back to our fear of – and lack of control over – death), but those of us who have experienced them know how easy it can be to trick ourselves into believing we have quit controlling for good. Who, us? We don’t control our environment! We let things happen and let people be free, autonomous individuals! We let the Universe flow! Until something happens that makes us feel less-than the grand image of ourselves we’ve created. Then the clawing, the biting, the manipulating, the screaming, the full-on emotional breakdown ensues and we quickly point our well-meaning fingers to how that situation or that person was just not working for us fairly. You get the picture.

Then back to our mats. Back to our breath. Back to letting go of that “I”-ness. But in the comfort of our daily lives, even this can be a facade. It’s easy to be a zen master when we know what to expect. Same classes each week, same group of smiling yogis, same bed to come back to at night. Nothing to shake us up or knock us off our “path.”

This is when we need to travel most. When I first joined Yoga Trade, I no doubt brought my control issues right along for the ride. I tried only to “choose” the opportunities that seemed the best and most outstanding. I wanted to cross countries off my list. I wanted to be around people that I thought would be a good fit for who I imagined myself to be.

It turned out it wasn’t working (surprise). The harder I tried to manifest my ideal situation, the less I felt like I was getting what I was looking for. So I packed up my things & decided to trek Europe with three friends instead. I was free to make my own choices – this situation was full of less surprises. How sad that we think this is what we want, when in fact we are simply stifling the magic from flowing in.

About one week – just one – into this no-destination backpacking affair, my counterparts and I decided our goals were wildly different – none of us were willing to relinquish that control of our Selves (surprise again) – and we amicably went separate ways. How could I have gone into travel thinking I knew what I was getting into, and ending up here so quickly? The lesson is – as anyone who’s traveled has learned – we always do. I spent a hot second in Barcelona feeling victimized by the Universe (“Why isn’t this trip going as I planned?!”) and going back and forth over whether to just call it quits and buy a ticket home. Whatever choice I made felt like a massive weight on my shoulders that would profoundly impact my worthiness as a human. The struggle to make the “right” (read: “perfect”) decision was real.

Welcome divine intervention. I received an email from a Yoga Trade member in Italy that had previously turned me down, but whose lead yoga teacher had gotten sick & couldn’t host the week-long retreat she was scheduled to lead and that began in less than 48 hours. So I hopped on the first train from Barcelona to Rome and made the trek to the profoundly quiet and peaceful mountain city apartment that would be my home for the next three weeks as I led some of the most brilliant and incredible yogis I’ve ever had the privilege to teach, not one, but three, consecutive yoga retreats.

The universe really drove it home for me (in case I hadn’t gotten it already) when the day after my arrival in Italy (which happened also to be my birthday) a fabulous Italian dinner that had been put on by my colleagues at the retreat was interrupted by shouts & music from outside. Rushing from our table, we found every inhabitant of the tiny town dancing in the streets during what must have been one of the few big celebrations of the year. At midnight that night on my birthday, these warm and welcoming residents of Casperia lit hundreds of heart-shaped lanterns and released them into the sky, where they floated out over the hills of vineyards and sunflower farms, competing with the stars, and appearing to laugh at me, at all of us, as if to say, “How could you – any of you – be anywhere but here?”

I learned much more about myself leading those retreats than I could have wandering the streets of Europe alone. Like most of us do, I quickly realized our path is an endless organic unfolding of free will – balanced quite evenly by natural intervention. Fate, serendipity, whatever you choose to call it, there is no doubt it should make us feel relieved, excited even, that we are absolutely not in full control. We can find joy in the fact that the Universe has plans for each of us that are so much grander, and more beautiful, and more perfectly designed to bring us to our greatest good, than any we could ever create on our own.

Travel with an open heart, an open mind, and a sense of abandon. Abandon what you know, what you want, what you think things should be. Because the truth is, things will always be exactly as they should.

 

 

 

Samantha Migliozzi is an E-RYT 200-hour that has been teaching for over seven years locally in New England and abroad. She has been a dedicated Yoga Trade user since its outset and has visited 15 countries in the past three years.

https://www.samanthanaturalhealth.com/

IG: @samimigliozzi

Yoga Business: How to Create Location Independence and Sustainable Success Catching Up With The Yoga Nomads

We feel extremely fortunate to know Anne and Brandon, aka The Yoga Nomads. We have been friends thru the Yoga Trade community for several years now. This inspiring couple left their successful jobs in Corporate America to follow their passions for yoga and travel. Following their hearts has allowed them to live their truth and create an incredible yoga business resource that helps yoga teachers build fulfilling careers. It has been amazing to learn, grow, and explore while on parallel tracks. The number one question many of us on this ‘yoga traveler’ path receive is, “How do you do it?” It often takes a lot more than just showing up to teach a yoga class to make this kind of lifestyle work. We recently caught up with Anne and Brandon to share some of their wisdom, real life experiences, and insights on how to create sustainable success as a roaming yoga teacher or wellness professional. 

 

Tell us a bit about how you are able to sustain your flow of yoga and travel…

 

Very carefully…!

 

Mentally & Physically:

Healthy daily routines: This is the foundation of everything we do. Without these practices, it can throw our lives off balance, especially while traveling. These include:

Daily meditation, eating nourishing food, staying hydrated, practicing yoga, being physically active, reading, podcasting and in general: learning! (Travel helps us learn so much about the world and ourselves, which influences everything we do!).

 

Financially:

Teaching yoga & The Yoga Nomads biz

In 2013 we made a decision to leave the corporate world for a more fulfilling work/life balance, seeking out meaningful work while getting to explore the world. We worked hard for a combined 10 years in corporate america so had a cushion to work with as we started The Yoga Nomads. Originally a blog showing yoga teachers how to travel + teach, we started making a name for ourselves in the market as this idea was just starting to become popular (traveling and teaching). Since then, our focus has shifted a bit to help yoga teachers create websites and build sustainable businesses. We earn the majority of our income on The Yoga Nomads through 1:1 yoga business coaching and we have an online course about how to build a website.

What is the number one piece of advice you like to pass along to aspiring traveling yoga teachers?

 

Build a website! This will help you stand out in a saturated market, get better teaching gigs abroad, and help you network while you build a business that sustains you as you travel.

 

How do you build community as a nomad?

 

We are both extroverted people so building community wherever we go comes naturally. One way we do this in the yoga space is by seeking out all the studios in the area we are traveling to and getting to know the owners, teachers and staff. We attend their classes, share with them our mission at The Yoga Nomads and ensure we leave connected online by exchanging emails, websites, social media, etc.

 

But because we live in a digital world, building community online is also important. We build community online by staying active on social media (actually genuinely engaging in FB groups, etc.), sending out a weekly newsletter to our email subscribers, and initiating and participating in challenges on social media.

 

Why are the qualities of; open to learn new skills, diversification, and commitment to mindful business responsibilities important for yoga teachers?

 

Because these are all qualities of successful entrepreneurs! And if you want to make it as a financially independent yoga teacher, it’s imperative you start thinking like an entrepreneur. Yoga teachers are entrepreneurs too!

 

 

Becoming ‘location independent’ is so hot right now. Can you share some knowledge on how someone interested in this kind of lifestyle can get started working toward this?

 

 

It is absolutely #trending right now! This makes things easier for those looking to make a change as there are plentiful resources on how to do it.

 

Before considering plunging into a location independent lifestyle, we recommend considering what your strengths are and what you are really good at doing/producing. Then begin to consider if these things are something you can take with you on the road or online.

 

Also, be sure to test the idea out at home first. Make sure you’re able to acquire clients and earn and income before you leave. Although traveling and working sounds amazing, it is actually quite difficult to balance travel and working full-time online. This is also why we highly recommend traveling SLOW. Slow travel fosters quicker growth for your business, as you’re not constantly moving around and changing work environments.

 

What trends and changes do you foresee within the yoga and wellness industry within the next 5-10 years?

 

As more people are getting curious and serious about their health, the industry for yoga teachers and wellness entrepreneurs is going to grow exponentially.

 

To continue to remain successful in your niche, yoga teachers and wellness entrepreneurs will need to take control over their own brand. This means building a website and creating a strong online presence. Having a website as your backbone will allow you to take full ownership over your current or future products and services and will act as your 24/7 marketing machine.

 

Furthermore, the crossover appeal is going to rise as well. With creating a healthy lifestyle becoming more popular (yay), yoga teachers with additional trades (nutritionist, chiropractor, bodyworker, etc.), will be servicing the same people with multiple offerings. The question is how can you be a part of that change as the world gets healthier?

 

What locations are on your current yoga travel bucket list?

 

Colombia, Switzerland, Australia…and more islands…!

 

Anything else you would like to share…..

 

If you don’t already have a yoga website and are curious about what it takes to create one, we put together a beginner’s guide for you, for free!

 

 

 

 

Anne and Brandon are a nomadic yogi couple from Minnesota. After a successful stint in Corporate America, they teach yoga instructors how to create their own website & build a fulfilling yoga career. Co-Founders of The Yoga Nomads and CreateBeautifulYogaWebsites.com

Download our FREE Beginners Guide: How to Create a Yoga Website you LOVE (7 steps).

Why All Traveling Yoga Teachers Need A Website

Becoming a traveling yoga teacher is more accessible than ever before due to resources like the internet and you know, Yoga Trade.

However, there are also way more “traveling yoga teachers” competing for the same opportunities. The “better” the gig, the more competition there is.

How can you stand out?

The most effective way to stand out from the crowd and land your perfect gig abroad – is to create your own website!

Having your own website is the foundation of becoming a successful traveling yoga teacher.

It will not only help you secure great teaching jobs, it will help you build your brand, increase your income, and attract more students wherever you are in the world.

In today’s technology driven world, anyone has the resources to build a website – even you!

So, before you even go there with “not being tech savvy enough” or “not having enough money…”

Websites don’t have to cost you an arm and a leg to get up and running. For real! With platforms like WordPress.org, you can create a beautiful yoga website for as little as $15/month!

And take it from me, the non-tech savvy girl… WordPress makes it super simple to build your own website. However, it does require some patience, an open weekend, and a few cups of tea.

Before I share why traveling yoga teachers need a website, I encourage you to download our FREE Beginners Guide to Creating a Yoga Website you Love (7 Steps). In this beginners guide we’ll walk you through the 7 steps required to create your own yoga website. It’s 100% free. No tech skills required.

Alright here we go, time to share the top 3 reasons why every traveling yoga teacher needs a website.

1) Secure more higher quality teaching gigs

When you become a traveling yoga teacher, getting that first job abroad is as nerve-racking as it is exhilarating! Hitting submit on the application process always leaves me a bit anxious.

Unfortunately, you’re not the only applicant waiting to hear back. With the popularity of traveling and teaching yoga, securing a job is becoming more competitive. Yoga teachers need a way to stand out from the crowd.

Creating your own yoga website will set you apart and play a massive role in securing more and even better yoga jobs abroad.

“These days, it goes a long way to have a solid online presence. Making a website or a resume landing page with great photos and savvy writing can help a lot.”
Erica, Co-founder of YogaTrade.com

When teaching abroad, it’s common not to meet your future employer until you arrive on your first day.

Having a website gives them a chance to see more of who you are and what you’re about.

Your website shows that you’re a committed professional who has the ability to attract more students to whatever studio you’re teaching at. (The studio hiring you cares about this tremendously).

Your website is also your resume – it showcases your teaching experience and credentials, but it also goes a step deeper by showcasing your personal style/brand.

With your own yoga website, your readers are able to get a sense of who you are through the images and content you personally curated to display. This distinguishes you from the rest of yogis applying for the same job.

Bonus: Your website gives you an outlet to share your travels and stories with everyone along the way!

 

2) Connect with yogis worldwide

Connection makes the world go ‘round!

The yogiverse is expanding all over our beautiful planet creating new opportunities to share your gifts with the people who will appreciate them most.

In our digital age, having your own website helps you make connections around the world that would otherwise be impossible. This means more customers, more business partners, and more friends.

How your website can help secure more clients (3 steps):

  1. Get clear on who you’re meant to serve – what is your unique niche/style/brand?
  2. Showcase the “real you” on your website
  3. Your ideal clients can find YOU online by searching your niche (ex: “yoga for surfers”)

Once your ideal clients start finding you, you can build a solid relationship through social media and your email newsletter.

Oh and not to mention, your website is an incredible networking tool!

Your website builds your credibility and shows that you take your yoga business seriously. You can more easily reach out to peers who have similar passions.

By serving a similar community, you have a great excuse to connect with your peers. You can share tips, discuss your challenges, and maybe even work together!

Now that you have a website, you’re “in the game” and there are many ways to collaborate with other website owners.

Also, having your own website allows you start connecting with people that are “out of your league.” Instead of reaching out “blind” – you have a reason to connect AND you can provide them something of value, such as featuring them on your website.  

3) Make some extra cash!

It can be challenging to earn a solid income on the road. Wouldn’t it be great to start earning a little income from your website while traveling?

After creating your website, you can start exploring different ways to “monetize your site.”

Just so we’re clear, just because you have a website doesn’t mean you’ll immediately start earning the big bucks. Creating a sustainable income online requires a consistent effort over time.

In 2014, my partner (Brandon) and I spent the year traveling and teaching yoga throughout Asia. Towards the end of that first year, we started earning enough from TheYogaNomads.com in order to pay for our travels. Whoa. I didn’t think that was possible!

Here are a few ways your website can start earning an income right away:

  1. a) Affiliate Marketing. Affiliate marketing is when you help market another person’s product, for example: your favorite traveling yoga mat. If one of your readers ends up buying the product/service you recommend, then you get a commission (at no extra cost to the person buying it). To get started, I recommend signing up for Amazon’s affiliate program and writing about your favorite yoga gear such as “your favorite traveling yoga mat.”
  2. b) Freelancing. You can get paid to write article for other online publications. Your website acts as an online resume for your previous work which will help you secure more (and higher paid) freelancing gigs. If you have other skills such as social media marketing or web design, you can also leverage your website to secure new clients.
  3. c) Market your own offering. Your website is your 24/7 marketing machine for any product or service you offer. You can share your offerings on your site and even accept payments (social media can’t do that). Products and services to consider: online yoga classes, online courses, yoga products, workshops, retreats, etc.


Let’s wrap up…

If you’re looking to make a successful career being a traveling yoga teacher, having a website is the foundation to your success!

 

Your website helps you secure teaching gigs abroad, network with students/peers, and monetize your website so you’re earning an income while traveling!

 

Before you go, be sure to grab our Beginner’s Guide to Creating a Yoga Website. 100% free.

 

Download this beginners guide to see what it takes to create your own website. It’s easier and (cheaper) than you might think. Join over 3,000+ yoga teachers committed to building a fulfilling business (and life).

 

Cheers to your success!

 

 

Anne is a Co-founder of TheYogaNomads.com and CreateBeautifulYogaWebsites.com – online communities dedicated to helping yoga teachers build profitable and sustainable careers. She’s originally from Minneapolis, but spends half the year teaching yoga abroad in places like Costa Rica and Bali. Download our FREE Beginners Guide: How to Create a Yoga Website you LOVE (7 steps).  

 

 

5 Myths About Soul-Searching Travel

After living abroad and traveling the world for almost four years now, I came to realize that the most important thing I discovered was myself. I learned more about the world, life and my true self than ever before. All because I decided to leave my comfort zone and finally follow my dreams.

By now, you’re probably thinking you know where this is going: “Oh gosh, here’s another girl who decided to quit her job, sell all her stuff, and leave everything behind, to travel the world and find herself!” Did I just read your mind?
Well, I’m sorry to disappoint you, but my story is a bit different. I had neither a well paid corporative job back home nor a two year savings. I didn’t have much stuff to sell either. And I certainly didn’t leave everything and everyone behind to travel solo.

Does this mean I didn’t embark on a true soul-searching journey? On the contrary. I don’t have to follow a script written by someone else to go on a journey of self-discovery. And you don’t have to do it either. What kind of lessons will you be learning if you’re just following other people’s path anyway?

I think there are too many misconceptions about traveling and self-discovery. And that’s why I put together this list of what I consider to be the 5 biggest myths about soul-searching travel, and what it really means to explore your true self while wandering the globe.

 

#1 You have to quit your job

You probably stumbled upon some version of this quit-my-job-sold-my-stuff-traveled-the-world story so many times already in the Internet that it seems everyone is doing it these days. You probably dream about doing the same thing yourself, don’t you? But the truth is most people who travel or move abroad don’t quit their jobs to see the world. Most people can’t afford, or just don’t want, to do that. Most importantly, you don’t need to in order to travel or find yourself.
When I moved from Portugal to Switzerland, with my boyfriend, two suitcases and a little more than 500 Euros on my bank account, the first thing I had to do was actually to find a job, so I could apply for a residence permit, and survive in one of the most expensive countries in the world. I also had to learn German and work my ass off to be allowed to stay here, pay my bills and be able to travel. So it’s perfectly possible to have a job – and a home and a family – and travel. For many of us it’s the only way to do it! You can travel and do some important soul-searching without even having to permanently move abroad or disrupt your entire life. At least until you are absolutely sure that’s what you want to do.

 

#2 You have to go alone

I’m sure you’ve also read the thousand headlines that go something like this: “How traveling solo changed my life” or “Why solo traveling is the best way to find yourself”. Again, it seems like that’s the only way to do it. But it’s not. Don’t get me wrong, solo travel is great. I’ve done it myself and I would definitely recommend you try it at least once in your lifetime, if that’s something that appeals to you. If it’s not, go with your friends, your sister, your soul-mate, your kids, or your dog. As long as you go! Nowadays I mostly travel with my boyfriend. And that doesn’t mean I don’t learn valuable lessons about myself during these trips, because I do. In a way, traveling with another person and spending most of your time together is even more challenging than traveling alone. You certainly learn more about tolerance and respect, compromising and setting boundaries than going solo.

 

#3 You have to travel long term

Another myth about soul-searching travel is that you have to be on the road for a year or two, or at least a couple of months, to really learn about yourself. I mean, that truly sounds amazing, but what happens if you, like me and many people, can’t take a gap year or a sabbatical leave? What happens if all you can manage is a two week vacation from work, and, if you’re lucky, a couple of weekends per year to get away? Well, you use that time to travel and find out new things about the world and yourself. On our first year in Switzerland, my boyfriend and I had zero vacation time. But we used almost every weekend and day off to go somewhere new. We made day trips to all major cities in Switzerland, we spent time in the mountains, and visited Germany and Italy. So much that we ended up knowing the country better than many locals. Some Swiss friends were amazed with how much we managed to see in such a short period of time. So it’s not about how long or how far you travel. It’s about what you learn on the way.

 

#4 You have to visit a spiritual destination

You hear about soul-searching travel and you immediately think about Tibet, India or Japan. You imagine yourself chanting with Buddhist monks, practicing yoga in an ashram or meditating in a Zen temple. You can’t possibly soul-search lying by the pool of a Mexico resort or wandering through the crowded streets of New York, right? Well, that’s one way to see it. The other way is that every experience teaches you something valuable about the world, yourself and others. Every place, every culture and every person has its own lessons to deliver, as long as you’re aware of that. One of my aha moments happened when I decided to take a solo trip to Athens for three days. See, I didn’t go to Bali, or Kenya, or Siberia. I went to the busy and chaotic capital of Greece, and it turned out to be a really empowering trip, that taught me that all I need to go somewhere or do something is myself. Sometimes the most valuable insights happen when and where you least expect them.

 

#5 You have to find your true calling

There was a time when I had no idea what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. I had been a journalist. I had been a yoga teacher. But at that point none of that seemed to be enough. I wanted more. I wanted to learn new things, I wanted to travel and see the world, I wanted to find myself, but I had no idea how. I kept reading articles about how to find my true calling, how to uncover my purpose in life, how to discover that one thing I was meant to do. And I kept getting anxious. Until one day it suddenly hit me: I don’t have to choose only one thing, I don’t have to find one calling, I can have as many callings and do as many things as I want to. I can be a writer, and a yoga teacher, and a traveler, and whatever more the future holds for me. That’s the beauty of existence. So that’s why I don’t travel to find my true calling anymore, and why you shouldn’t either. You should travel to live all sorts of experiences, try all kinds of things that appeal to you, and find everything that gives meaning to your life.

There are no rules for your own soul-searching journey. There’s no correct way to do it. Because all journeys are journeys of the self. Like every new experience in life, every trip is an opportunity to explore the world and who you are, to get out of your comfort zone and into yourself. You don’t have to go far, to go alone or to leave everything behind. You just have to go, and all the lessons will arise.

 

 

 

 

Vanda is a journalist turned yoga teacher turned travel blogger. Combining her passion for writing, traveling and self-discovery, she writes about living abroad, exploring the globe, and the soul-searching that arise from both. Connect at theyogiwanderer.com

Helping Others, One Handstand at a Time

It all started with a handstand. Paige Elenson was on a family trip in Africa when she connected with some fellow inversion junkies in passing. They shared tips and tricks and contact information to keep in touch. Little did they know, this chance encounter was about to turn entire lives upside down.

Paige saw first-hand the power of connection that yoga offers the world. The cross-cultural, knows no boundaries, no age, makes you laugh while upside down kind of connection that empowers and keeps people coming back for more and more and more. Inspired by this connection, Paige returned to Kenya and founded Africa Yoga Project (“AYP”) in 2007.

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What AYP does is nothing short of miraculous. The organization educates, empowers, elevates and expands employability with youth in Africa using the transformational practice of yoga. AYP creates opportunities for youth to step into their greatness and become self-sustaining leaders in their communities. Today, the organization employs more than 100 teachers, offers 300 weekly classes, and reaches 6,000 students weekly.

Wow. Just wow. What’s just as incredible is how much this organization inspires people across the world to show up and contribute to the cause. I found out about AYP at Baptiste trainings in June and October 2016. During these trainings I learned about Baron Baptiste’s own trip to Kenya and met AYP teacher training graduates Patrick, Millie and Walter. Hearing their stories and having their support during my own training really struck me. One of the main teachings in Baptiste yoga is “be up to something bigger than yourself”. Seeing others embodying and living from this idea was extremely powerful and I felt called upon to be a part of this cause, to support other teachers and give back to the practice that has given so much to me.

In between trainings I did my research on the different options to get involved, as there are quite a few! There really is something for everyone, from those looking to travel, mentor, or provide financial support. Ultimately, I decided to assist the 200hr teacher training in April 2017 in Nairobi. As a voluntary assistant, I’m also responsible for fundraising before my trip, which is totally new for me! Although it sounds a little daunting, I’m truly excited to to spread the word about AYP to my local community at studios, gyms, and through community events over the next few months. I think it’s a great way to drive awareness for AYP and connect my students with yoga on a global scale.

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Here are a few ways you too can get involved with this game changing organization:

  • Donate to the cause – Every. Little. Bit. Counts. Contributions make the community outreach efforts of AYP possible, such as scholarships, food programs, building projects, medical assistance, and employment.
  • Be an Ambassador – Have a special skill or expertise? Lead a trip of Seva Safari volunteers to Kenya to share this with the AYP community.
  • Join a Seva Safari – Great for those looking to travel to Kenya and assist an ambassador’s project you’re interested in. Check out your options, connect with the safari leader, and commit to an amazing and unique experience.
  • Assist a teacher training – Note that you must be Baptiste Level 1 and Level 2 certified to be involved on this program.
  • Mentor a yoga teacher – Connect with a newly certified teacher to help them on their teaching journey.
  • Host a fundraising event – Share AYP with your local community through donation based classes, a happy hour or anything in between.
  • Follow @africayogaproject – Stay up to date on all things AYP!
  • Share this post with your friends – You might just inspire someone to get involved too!

If you feel compelled, called, or are ready to be up to something bigger than yourself too, reach out to programs@africayogaproject.org to find out even more. Maybe I’ll even see you in Nairobi in April!

Handstands, hugs and happiness!

 

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Siobhan is a yoga teacher based in Chicago. You can follow her Africa Yoga Project fundraising here and her whole yoga loving life on Instagram. She finds joy in creative and powerful vinyasa, dark chocolate and spending time with family and friends.

5 Soulful Yoga Studios Along the California Coast

I grew up in California. Not on the coast, but in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Maybe this is why I have been so obsessed with the ocean the past 8 years; because it is different, mysterious, alluring. Whatever the case, I have deep gratitude for having the opportunity to explore the ways of the ocean and all of her beauty. In fact, I believe the ocean has been and IS one of my greatest spiritual teachers. Fall is such a special time of year, especially on the California Coast, and inspiration for this article was sparked by my itch to get to the ocean after living at high elevation all summer. An ideal road trip for me includes; visiting friends, surf exploration, day hikes, and taking classes at new and different yoga studios. Some of these towns mentioned below I have lived in, while some I just pass through. All of these studios have touched my heart, have wonderful teachers, and are small studios that are full of SOUL. They are all wonderful places to stop and rejuvenate along or near the PCH (Pacific Coast Highway). I highly recommend that next time you are cruising the coast, slow down and make time to take a class at one of these gems.

CALIFORNIA COASTAL STUDIOS…From NORTH to SOUTH:

YOGA TOES, Point Reyes, CA

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This studio is nestled inside of Toby’s Feed Barn in the ridiculously adorable town of Point Reyes Station. It has a warm and welcoming vibe with a great mix of classes. It is the home studio of MC Yogi and his partner Amanda Giacomini. Point Reyes is a glorious town for nature lovers and hip foodies. It has an amazing Farmer’s Market on Saturdays where you can connect with local North Bay Farmers and passionate vendors such as Wild West Ferments. After class, head to the Point Reyes Seashore where you will find an abundance of diverse hikes, beaches, and wildlife.

ENSO, Half Moon Bay, CA

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Enso is a center for yoga and art. Enso is very dear to me as it is the studio that allowed me to really fall in love with yoga. For one year I lived in the area and consistently took classes with amazing teacher, Amy Outman. The studio is located on the coastal trail and has views of the sea. The wood burning stove is magnificent on foggy Half Moon Bay days. The wind and rain are amplified by the tin roof in this 100 year old warehouse structure. It is easy to feel a deep connection with nature while practicing here. They also host an array of community gatherings, art, and music events. Truly a jewel on the coast. After class, visit Raman’s Chai for a cup of goodness.

 

PLEASURE POINT YOGA, Santa Cruz, CA

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Photo: Sawdust Imagery

This is a vibrant, colorful studio on the east side of Santa Cruz. Great local vibes. They have an eclectic mix of classes for all levels. The first word that comes to mind when I think about this studio is: FUN! The studio is walking distance to Pleasure Point surf breaks and many restaurants and shops. Pleasure Point Yoga boasts an amazing lineup of intelligent and compassionate teachers and they frequently feature incredible workshops by international guest teachers. Studio owner, Aimee Joy Nitzberg is a true inspiration.

HARMONY HOUSE YOGA, Pismo Beach, CA

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A heartfelt and cozy studio in downtown Pismo Beach. They offer a variety of classes with a strong emphasis on community. Started by Kelly Metcalf, a traveler, ocean lover, and surfer with strong roots in the area. They also have a really nice boutique with unique yoga and wellness treasures. After class, get a smoothie at Honeymoon Cafe just next door or take a short stroll to the ocean.

YOGA BERGAMOT, Encinitas, CA

(Now GATHER Encinitas)

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Encinitas is known for being a yoga mecca and offers a large variety of yoga studios. This one is a little off the beaten path but well worth a visit! It is a tiny space with a huge heart. One thing that makes this studio so special is their commitment to making yoga accessible to everyone by way of a donation model. Take a class with studio founder Lauren Duke, who is known for her raw disposition and her love of sharing the spirit of yoga. Walking distance to many fun beach breaks, and always amazing weather in sunny San Diego:)

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THANK YOU, THANK YOU to all the committed students, teachers and yoga communities out there. Keep doing what you makes you feel alive and share the love!

NAMASTE.

 

 

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Erica Hartnick grew up in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California, and enjoys all things wild and free. She teaches nature inspired yoga and leads mindful adventures in California and Costa Rica. She gets excited about; LEARNING, intense weather, glassy ocean peaks, pillows of fresh powder snow, crystal clear water, positive people, cultural travel, thriving vegetable gardens, fresh mint chip ice cream, nature’s glory, LIVING YOGA, and connecting with others. She is passionate about the collaboration with friends that led to the creation of Yoga Trade, and is devoted to connecting the yoga community with infinite opportunities!

Waves of Experience

I was on the train to Cinque Terre gazing out the window at the gorgeous waters of the Italian Riviera and reflecting on my travels. I realized how traveling is a vast ocean of lessons and helps bring out the essence of who we truly are.

We’re all like rocks along the shore, molded by each wave of experience. Each wave brings new wisdom, new perspective, and new acceptance. It rounds our edges, helps form who we are, and what we bring to this world.

As we experience other cultures and learn from how others live, we gain insight on how we want to live and what we value.

In my travels so far, two things continue to have a profound impact: the ability to be flexible in my plans & the courage to ask.

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Be Flexible

Plan what you can, but also plan for all of that to go out the window. Whether it’s a train you need to catch, a housing situation that turns out to not be at all what you expected, or a change in itinerary, things will happen and it’s so important to be flexible. I’m not saying that it won’t feel frustrating or like your patience is being tested, but that’s all part of the experience. All you can do is make the best of the situation. Be willing to see where the new turn of events take you.

Just Ask

Have the courage to ask. It might feel intimidating to approach someone for help in a different language or for an opportunity to teach a yoga class, but the only thing you can do is ask. Maybe they say no, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t someone waiting to say yes to you.

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It’s common for people to feel afraid of looking stupid or of rejection, but acknowledge the fear and then do it anyway. Being brave isn’t about being fearless, but not letting that fear paralyze you.

I once heard that life is like a pendulum, swinging back and forth. You have to take action and even your so-called “failures” will propel you forward into success, whatever success means to you.

So take each wave of experience as it comes, be flexible, be courageous, and keep moving forward!

 

 

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Shannon Handa is a Yoga Trade Travel Rep and travels to teach and practice yoga in different countries to explore the similarities and differences in how it’s approached. She writes about her travels on her blog, Yoga Across the Globe, to share her experiences with fellow yogis.

Connect:

http://www.yogaacrosstheglobe.com/

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